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Thursday, October 15, 2020 | History

6 edition of Ion-Coupled Sugar Transport in Microorganisms found in the catalog.

Ion-Coupled Sugar Transport in Microorganisms

Ion-Coupled Sugar Transport in Microorganisms

  • 75 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by CRC .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Microbial Biochemistry,
  • Science/Mathematics

  • The Physical Object
    FormatLoose leaf
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL11560067M
    ISBN 100849365295
    ISBN 109780849365294
    OCLC/WorldCa232952204

    Fermentation reacts NADH with an endogenous, organic electron acceptor. Usually this is pyruvate formed from sugar through reaction produces NAD + and an organic product, typical examples being ethanol, lactic acid, and hydrogen gas (H 2), and often also carbon r, more exotic compounds can be produced by fermentation, such as butyric acid and acetone. Transport of Microorganisms in the Terrestrial Subsurface: In Situ and Laboratory Methods, p In Hurst C, Crawford R, Garland J, Lipson D, Mills A, Stetzenbach L (ed), Manual of Environmental Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: /ch

    The concept for sodium–sugar cotransport was developed and proven between and As reviewed in (Kimmich, ), Riklis and Quastel observed in perfused guinea pig intestine that complete replacement of sodium by potassium abolished all active transport of d-glucose (Riklis & Quastel, ).Csaky and Thale () confirmed the sodium dependence of active sugar transport . Bacteria - Bacteria - Bacterial metabolism: As stated above, heterotrophic (or organotrophic) bacteria require organic molecules to provide their carbon and energy. The energy-yielding catabolic reactions can be of many different types, although they all involve electron-transfer reactions in which the movement of an electron from one molecule to another is coupled with an energy-trapping.

    The processes of making and breaking down sugar molecules illustrate two examples of metabolic pathways. A metabolic pathway is a series of chemical reactions that takes a starting molecule and modifies it, step-by-step, through a series of metabolic intermediates, eventually yielding a final product. In recent years, the focus shifted to the genetic basis of the microorganisms and the molecular aspects of the cells, including metabolism, membrane transport, and regulation. These different stages of wine research were determined by the scientific methods that were known and available at the respective time.


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Ion-Coupled Sugar Transport in Microorganisms Download PDF EPUB FB2

: Sugar Transport and Metabolism in Gram-Positive Bacteria (Ellis Horwood Series in Biochemistry and Biotechnology) (): Jonathan Reizer, Alan Peterkofsky: BooksAuthor: Jonathan Reizer. Eddy, A. Proton-dependent solute transport in microorganisms.

Curr. Top. Membr. Transp. – S. Ion-coupled transport across biological membranes. In: Physiology of Sodium- coupled amino acid and sugar transport by Necturus small intestine: An equivalent electrical circuit analysis of a rheogenic co Cited by:   Purchase Transport Processes in Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic Organisms, Volume 2 - 1st Edition.

Print Book & E-Book. ISBNBook Edition: 1. Ion-Coupled Sugar Transport in Microorganisms book This active transport of sugar into the companion cells occurs via a proton-sucrose symporter; the companion cells use an ATP-powered proton pump to create an electrochemical gradient outside of the cell.

The cotransport of a proton with sucrose allows movement of sucrose against its concentration gradient into the companion cells. Products grouped in the sugar confectionery category include hard candy, soft/gummy candy, caramel, toffee, licorice, marzipan, creams, jellies, and nougats.

A common intrinsic parameter associated with high-sugar products is their low water activity (a w), which is known to inhibit the growth of most spoilage and pathogenic bacteria.

However Cited by: 9. Soluble sugars serve five main purposes in multicellular organisms: as sources of carbon skeletons, osmolytes, signals, and transient energy storage and as transport molecules.

Most sugars are derived from photosynthetic organisms, particularly plants. In multicellular organisms, some cells specialize in providing sugars to other cells (e.g., intestinal and liver cells in animals. ELSEVIER BBA Biochimica et Biophysica Acta () Biochimica et Biophysica &cta Na+-coupled versus H+-coupled energy transduction in bacteria J.S.

Lolkema, G. Speelmans, W.N. Konings Department of Microbiology, University of Groningen, Kerkl NN Haren, The Netherlands Received 7 March Key words: Membrane transport; Ion pump; Proton. In cotransport, the direction of transport is the same for both the driving ion and driven ion/molecule.

For example, the Na + /glucose cotransporter (SGLT1), found in the small intestine and kidney proximal tubules, simultaneously transports 2 Na + ions and 1 glucose molecule into the cell across the plasma membrane.

In contrast, in exchange, the driving ion and driven ion/molecule move. Tim Sandle, in Pharmaceutical Microbiology, Nutrients. Microorganisms require certain basic nutrients for growth and maintenance of metabolic functions.

The amount and type of nutrients required range widely depending on the microorganism. Microorganisms can derive energy from carbohydrates, alcohols, and amino acids.

Microscopic organisms, commonly known as microorganisms or microbes, are found all around us and even inside our bodies.

The category ‘Microbes’ includes a massive range of organisms including bacteria, fungi, viruses, algae, archaea and protozoa. Some of these, such as bacteria and fungi, are well known, but others such as archaea much less so. Microorganisms, [ ]. Furthermore, the ability of plants to modulate sugar transport and export from roots may be a key determinant of the critical balance between defending against pathogens and recruiting beneficial microorganisms in the rhizosphere (Doidy et al.

Sugar transportome in beneficial plant–microorganism interactions. Ion-coupled transporters link uphill solute transport to downhill electrochemical ion gradients.

In mammals, these transporters are coupled to the co-transport of H+, Na+, Cl- and/or to the. Sugar transporter proteins (STPs), such as H+/sugar symporters, play essential roles in plants’ sugar transport, growth, and development, and possess an important potential to enhance plants’ performance of multiple agronomic traits, especially crop yield and stress tolerance.

However, the evolutionary dynamics of this important gene family in Gramineae crops are still not well-documented. In this article, we review current knowledge on diversity and functions of sugar transporters, especially those associated with pentose uptake in microorganisms.

Subsequently, we review and discuss recent studies on engineering of sugar transport as a driving force for efficient bioconversion of sugar mixtures derived from lignocellulose.

Guan, H.R. Kaback, in Encyclopedia of Biological Chemistry (Second Edition), Abstract. Three types of sugar transport systems are found in bacteria: the phospho enolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS), electrochemical cation-gradient-driven, and binding protein-dependent adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) import systems.

Different forms of biological energy. Alkaline Salt Transport Medium Taurocholate Peptone Transport Medium: Transport media for diarrheal diseases suspected of being caused by V. cholerae Anaerobic Media: Liquid media by addition of Glucose ( % to 1 %) Ascorbic Acid ( %) Cysteine ( %) Sodium Merceptoacetate ( %).

Food preservation, any of a number of methods by which food is kept from spoilage after harvest or slaughter. Such practices date to prehistoric times. Some of the oldest preservation methods include drying and refrigeration.

Modern methods are more sophisticated. Learn about the importance and methods of preservation. Fumarate Transport.

Several amino acids including asparagine and aspartate are deaminated at fast rates by H. pylori, and fumarate is a main product of the catabolism of these two amino acids (). pylori metabolizes fumarate (27, 32), and the presence of intermediary fermentative metabolism has been established (8, 24, 31, 33).Conversion of pyruvate to acetate and formate provides evidence.

PEP group translocation, also known as the phosphotransferase system or PTS, is a distinct method used by bacteria for sugar uptake where the source of energy is from phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP).It is known to be a multicomponent system that always involves enzymes of the plasma membrane and those in the cytoplasm.

The PTS system uses active transport. After the translocation across the. Transport media are essentially solutions of buffers with carbohydrates, peptones and other nutrients (excluding growth factors) designed to preserve the viability of bacteria during transport without allowing their primary objective of the use of the transport medium is to maintain the specimen as near its original state as possible.

Active transport is defined as the energy-consuming transport of molecules or ions across a membrane against a concentration gradient, made possible by transferring energy from respiration.

The energy is supplied by ATP, and is used to make the transport protein change its 3d shape, transferring the molecules or ions across the membrane in the.Active cellular transportation (ACT) Unlike passive transport, which uses the kinetic energy and natural entropy of molecules moving down a gradient, active transport uses cellular energy to move them against a gradient, polar repulsion, or other resistance.

Active transport is usually associated with accumulating high concentrations of molecules that the cell needs, such as ions, glucose and.TYPES OF TRANSPORTERS FOUND IN NATURE. Figure Figure3 3 shows five well-documented modes of transport, all found in bacteria.

These processes include free diffusion of molecules through transmembrane channels (panel a), secondary active transport involving the coupling of solute transport to ion flux with or without an extracytoplasmic receptor (panel c or b, respectively), primary .